Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

United States v. Okun

United States District Court, E.D. Virginia, Richmond Division

March 25, 2015

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
v.
EDWARD HUGH OKUN

MEMORANDUM OPINION

ROBERT E. PAYNE, Senior District Judge.

The matter is before the Court on the "MOTION FOR NEW TRIAL or, in the alternative, MOTION FOR SETTING ASIDE THE FINDING OF THE JURY" (ECF No. 407), "MOTION FOR DEFAULT JUDGMENT AGAINST THE RESPONDENT/GOVERNMENT, " (ECF No. 462), and "REQUEST FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT" on pending motions (ECF NO. 464) filed by Edward High Okun. The Government has responded. These matters are ripe for disposition.

I. PROCEDURAL HISTORY

On March 17, 2008, a grand jury returned a three-count indictment charging Okun with mail fraud, bulk cash smuggling, and one count of making a false declaration. (ECF No. 1.) On July 10, 2008, a grand jury returned a twenty-seven count Superseding Indictment charging Okun with conspiracy to commit wire fraud and mail fraud, conspiracy to commit money laundering, thirteen counts of wire fraud, and multiple other counts of mail fraud, money laundering, bulk cash smuggling, and making a false declaration. (ECF No. 42.) On February 27, 2009, the Court granted the Government's motion to dismiss one wire fraud count and one mail fraud count (Counts 9 and 18). (ECF No. 207.)

On March 3, 2009, the jury trial commenced. After the Government rested its case, Okun moved for a judgment of acquittal on all counts pursuant to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 29. (ECF No. 232.) The Court granted the motion with respect to the two remaining mail fraud charges (Counts 16 and 17), but denied the motion on the remaining counts. (Id.) Okun put forth no evidence in his defense. After two-days of deliberations, the jury returned its verdict, finding Okun guilty of the remaining twenty-three counts. (ECF No. 243.)

On August 4, 2009, the Court sentenced Okun to 1200 months of imprisonment, a downward variance from the guidelines range of 4800 months of imprisonment. (J. 3, ECF No. 328.) Okun appealed, and on November 17, 2011, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit affirmed Okun's conviction and sentence. United States v. Okun, 453 F.App'x 364, 374 (4th Cir. 2011). On April 16, 2012, the United States Supreme Court denied a petition for certiorari. Okun v. United States, 132 S.Ct. 1953, 1953 (2012). On March 12, 2012, Okun filed his "MOTION FOR NEW TRIAL or, in the alternative, MOTION FOR SETTING ASIDE THE FINDING OF THE JURY." Since that time, Okun has inundated the Court with frivolous filings. As explained below, both Okun's "MOTION FOR SETTING ASIDE THE FINDING OF THE JURY" ("Rule 29 Motion") and his "MOTION FOR NEW TRIAL" ("Rule 33 Motion") will be denied.

II. RULE 29 MOTION

Under Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure Rule 29(c)(1), a "[a] defendant may move for a judgment of acquittal, or renew such a motion, within 14 days after a guilty verdict or after the court discharges the jury, whichever is later." Fed. R. Crim. P. 29(c) (1). The jury returned its guilty verdict on March 19, 2009. Okun filed the current Rule 29 Motion nearly three years later on March 12, 2012. Accordingly, Okun's Rule 29 Motion is untimely filed and will be denied.

III. RULE 33 MOTION

A. Summary of Evidence

The Fourth Circuit aptly summarized the evidence of Okun's guilt as follows:

In 2005, Okun was the sole owner of Investment Properties of America (IPofA), a Virginia limited liability company, with its principal place of business in Richmond, Virginia. IPofA was involved in the business of commercial real estate investment and management. In 2005, Okun formed 1031 Tax Group, a Delaware limited liability company with its principal place of business in Richmond.
In connection with 1031 Tax Group, Okun became involved in the business of operating qualified intermediary (QI) companies.[1] Between August 2005 and December 2006, Okun acquired six different QI companies, which in turn became subsidiaries of 1031 Tax Group.
After acquiring his first QI company, Atlantic Exchange Company (AEC), Okun began to wire AEC client funds to his personal bank account and IPofA's bank account, with the assistance of Lara Coleman, IPofA's Chief Operating Officer. During the conspiracy, Coleman continued to assist Okun in the fraudulent scheme, which enabled Okun to use money held by the QI companies on behalf of the exchangers for personal use and for purposes related to IPofA's business. The uses of the funds held by the QI companies were not disclosed to the exchangers and were in violation of the agreements between the exchangers and the QI companies.
In 2007, Janet Dashiell, who had managed one of the QI companies acquired by Okun, began to work for 1031 Tax Group. Dashiell alerted the government to the manner in which the QI funds were being used by Okun and 1031 Tax Group.
In May 2007, 1031 Tax Group filed for bankruptcy. The collapse of 1031 Tax Group ultimately resulted in a loss in excess of $125 million dollars to exchangers who had deposited funds with ...

Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.