Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Mohamed v. Holder

United States District Court, E.D. Virginia, Alexandria Division

July 16, 2015

GULET MOHAMED, Plaintiff,
v.
ERIC H. HOLDER, JR., et al., Defendants.

MEMORANDUM OPINION

ANTHONY J. TRENGA, District Judge.

Plaintiff Gulet Mohamed (Plaintiff or "Mohamed") has challenged his alleged placement on the No Fly List. The No Fly List is a list of persons who are precluded from flying on commercial aircraft because they are suspected terrorists. Compiled by the Terrorism Screening Center (TSC) and enforced against travelers by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) through commercial airlines, the No Fly List is intended to ensure aircraft safety as well as to restrict the ability of suspected terrorists to move freely in furtherance of terrorist activities, within the United States and internationally. Mohamed is an American citizen who was denied boarding on an international flight by an American carrier. He has not been convicted of, charged with or alleged to have committed a criminal offense related to terrorism or otherwise; and when applied to such an American citizen, the No Fly List represents, as the United States concedes, an unprecedented application of Executive branch authority in the name of national security through secret administrative proceedings based on undisclosed information according to undisclosed criteria.

This litigation centrally concerns what information must be made available to an American citizen in order to provide a constitutionally adequate opportunity to challenge a placement on the No Fly List. That constitutional inquiry presents unsettled issues that are complicated in their resolution by the criteria used to compile the No Fly List and the classified information that, of necessity, is used to determine whether a person satisfies that criteria.

Presently pending are the parties' cross-motions for summary judgment with respect to Mohamed's claim in Count 3 of his Fourth Amended Complaint that he was denied a meaningful opportunity to challenge his inability to fly on commercial aircraft, in violation of his Fifth Amendment procedural due process rights.[1] Specifically, Mohamed claims that he has not been provided notice of his placement on the No Fly List, either before or after he was denied boarding, or a meaningful opportunity to refute any derogatory information that was used to place him on the No Fly List. He claims, in effect, that he has been denied the opportunity to establish that he poses no threat to commercial aviation. He further claims that as result of these constitutional violations, he has been denied his liberty interests in (1) traveling by air, (2) being able to return to the United States after travelling abroad; and (3) being free from false governmental stigmatization as a terrorist. See Fourth Amended Complaint, Doc. No. 85, ¶ 64.

In their summary judgment motion, defendants claim that the Department of Homeland Security's Traveler Redress Inquiry Program (DHS TRIP), the review process by which a person denied boarding may request a review of his status, was constitutionally adequate, any constitutional infirmities with that process have been cured through revised review procedures, and Mohamed's procedural due process claims are therefore moot. They also contend in the alternative that should the Court not grant summary judgment in their favor, Mohamed's procedural due process claims should nevertheless be dismissed on the basis of the state secrets privilege. Doc. No. 159.

For the reasons stated herein, the defendants' Motion for Partial Summary Judgment is DENIED and Plaintiffs Motion for Partial Summary Judgment as to Count 3 is GRANTED in part and DENIED in part. Briefly summarized, the Court first concludes that DHS TRIP, as that process existed at the time that Mohamed was denied boarding, did not provide a constitutionally adequate opportunity to challenge his denial of boarding. Second, after a review of documents and information submitted by the defendants in camera and ex parte, the Court concludes that there is no information protected from disclosure under the state secrets privilege that is necessary either for Mohamed to establish liability under his procedural due process claims or for the defendants to establish an available defense to that claim. Third, based on the current record, the Court cannot conclude as a matter of law whether the revised DHS TRIP process now available to Mohamed is constitutionally adequate.

The Court further concludes that the constitutional adequacy of the revised DHS TRIP cannot be made until after Mohamed requests a review of his status under that revised process, the TSC and TSA respond, and an administrative record is compiled that allows a reviewing court to assess, to the extent it deems appropriate: (1) whether Mohamed has received notice that he is, in fact, on the No Fly List; (2) if on the No Fly List, the level of factual detail provided to Mohamed concerning the reasons for his inclusion on the No Fly List, including whether he has been provided the specific criteria relied on and the specific factual findings used to satisfy that specific criteria; (3) whether the factual information provided allow a reasonable opportunity to rebut any derogatory information used for his placement on the No Fly List; (4) what factual information was withheld from Mohamed concerning the reasons for his inclusion, the reasons for withholding that information and whether additional material information could have been provided, either directly or through alternative means, such as summaries or redacted documents; (5) what information Mohamed provided or had an opportunity to provide, and in what form, including whether he appropriately responded to any specific requests for information; and (6) whether Mohamed's status is at the appropriate level of security restrictions for the level of threat sufficiently established by that administrative record.

I. Background

The factual and procedural history of this case are set forth in detail in this Court's January 22, 2014 Memorandum Opinion. See Mohamed v. Holder, 995 F.Supp.2d 520, 522-27 (E.D.Va. 2014).

Briefly summarized, Mohamed is a U.S. citizen of Somali descent, who alleges that in 2009, at the age of 16, he temporarily left the United States to travel to Yemen, Somalia and Kuwait in order to meet family, study Arabic and attend school. Beginning on December 20, 2010, Kuwait authorities detained him at a deportation facility, during which time he alleges he was interrogated, beaten and tortured. FBI agents visited him twice at the deportation facility, once on December 28, 2010 and again on January 12, 2011. On January 16, 2011, Mohamed's family purchased a ticket for him to return to the United States at the suggestion of Kuwaiti officials, who delivered the ticket to Mohamed and transported him to the airport, where he was denied boarding. On January 18, 2011, Mohamed filed this action against the defendants, which include the heads of the Department of Justice (DOJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Terrorist Screening Center (TSC), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the

Transportation Security Administration (TSA) (hereafter "the defendants"), seeking, inter alia, emergency relief to return to the United States. Doc. No. 1. On January 20, 2011, the defendants advised the Court that arrangements had been made for Mohamed to return to the United States. Mohamed returned to the United States via commercial airliner on January 21, 2011.

The process for inclusion on the No Fly List has also been discussed in previous opinions.[2] See Mohamed v. Holder, 1:11-CV-50 AJT/TRJ, 2011 WL 3820711, at * 10 (E.D. Va. Aug. 26, 2011); Mohamed v. Holder, 995 F.Supp.2d 520, 525-27 (E.D.Va. 2014). Briefly summarized, the Terrorist Screening Center ("TSC") is responsible for maintaining the Terrorist Screening Database (TSDB), of which the No Fly List is a subset. The standard for inclusion in the TSDB is "reasonable suspicion to establish that the individual is a known or suspected terrorist." Doc. No. 158-1, Grigg Decl. at ¶ 15. The defendants have alternatively phrased this standard as "known or appropriately suspected to be or to have engaged in conduct constituting, in preparation for, in aid of, or related to terrorism." Doc. No. 158-2, Declaration of Michael Steinbach, Assistant Director of FBI Counterterrorism Division, at ¶ 12. See HSPD-6. Certain government agencies may nominate individuals to be included on the TSDB. Nominations must be supported by sufficient identifying information as well as substantive criteria, also known as "derogatory information."

To be included on the No Fly List subset, there must be a reasonable suspicion that the individual meets additional, heightened derogatory criteria beyond that required for inclusion in the TSDB, namely, reasonable suspicion that the individual is a known or suspected terrorist based on meeting one of the following criteria:

The individual poses a threat of (1) committing an act of international terrorism (as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 2331(1)) or an act of domestic terrorism (as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 2331(5)) with respect to an aircraft; (2) committing an act of domestic terrorism (as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 2331(5)) with respect to the homeland; (3) committing an act of international terrorism (as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 2331(1)) against any U.S. Government facility abroad and associated or supporting personnel, including U.S. embassies, consulates and missions, military installations, U.S. ships, U.S. aircraft, or other auxiliary craft owned or leased by the U.S. Government; or (4) engaging in or conducting a violent act of terrorism and who is operationally capable of doing so.

Doc. No. 158-1, Declaration of G. Clayton Grigg, Deputy Director for Operations of TSC, at K 18. The reasonable suspicion must be supported by "articulable" intelligence and must be based on the "totality of circumstances" and intelligence reviewed.

Over the course of the litigation, defendants have filed several motions to dismiss this action in its entirety on a variety of grounds. See Doc. Nos. 10, 22, 58 (challenging Mohamed's standing to bring the action, the Court's jurisdiction over the action, and the legal sufficiency of Mohamed's allegations). With respect to jurisdiction, by Order dated August 26, 2011, the Court dismissed certain claims and transferred others to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals on the grounds that the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals had exclusive jurisdiction pursuant to 49 U.S.C. § 49110(a). See Mohamed v. Holder, No. 1:11-CV-50 AJT/TRJ, 2011 WL 3820711, at *10 (E.D. Va. Aug. 26, 2011). On May 28, 2013, the Fourth Circuit concluded that its exclusive jurisdiction pursuant to 49 U.S.C. § 49110 did not extend to claims and remedies against TSC and remanded the case for further proceedings. Doc. No. 45.[3] On January 22, 2014, following that remand, the Court held that Mohamed had standing to bring his remanded claims and that his remanded claims were ripe for review, despite Mohamed's failure to request review of his status under the DHS TRIP. It also granted the defendants' motion to dismiss Mohamed's claim, asserted in Count 1, that he was prevented from re-entering the United States in January 2011 in violation of his constitutional right of return to the United States. It denied the motion to dismiss any remaining substantive due process claims in Count 1, his Administrative Procedure Act claim in Count 2, and his procedural due process claims in Count 3. 995 F.Supp.2d at 539.

On May 28, 2014, the defendants filed a motion to dismiss the case in its entirety based on their invocation of the state secrets privilege. See Doc. Nos. 104-105. On September 15, 2014, after reviewing the declarations of certain high level officials from the TSC, as well as the Attorney General, the Court ordered the defendants to submit for ex parte, in camera review those documents pertaining to the due process claims that they considered covered by the state secrets privilege and law enforcement privilege. Doc. No. 139. The defendants complied and on October 30, 2014, after reviewing those documents in camera, the Court concluded that those documents were not "so related to [Mohamed]'s procedural due process claims as to prevent either the plaintiff or the defendant from presenting or defending against those claims without the use of any of [those] documents." The Court therefore denied the defendants' motion to dismiss Mohamed's procedural due process claims based on defendants' invocation of the state secrets privilege. Doc. No. 144. The Court specifically advised, however, that "to the extent that the defendants contend during the actual adjudication of these claims, within the context of either summary judgment or any evidentiary hearing, that it cannot adequately defend against such claims without the use of a specific document claimed to be protected under the state secrets privilege, the Court will consider that claim in that specific context." Id.

On December 9, 2014, cross-motions for summary judgment were filed as to Mohamed's procedural due process claim. Doc. Nos. 158, 161. In their motion for summary judgment, defendants again invoked the state secrets privilege to dismiss the procedural due process claim as an alternative grounds for their summary judgment motion. On January 30, 2015, the Court heard oral argument on those cross-motions for summary judgment. Following that hearing, it scheduled an ex parte, in camera closed hearing "to provide the defendants with the opportunity to provide and the Court to consider additional information concerning the defendants' claims concerning the existence of state secrets and their relevance to the pending procedural due process claims." Doc. No. 173. The Court also identified in that Order specific issues to be discussed in that closed hearing, which the Court held on March 17, 2015. See Id. at p. 2-3.[4]

II. Legal Standard

Summary judgment is appropriate only if the record shows that "there is no genuine issue as to any material fact and that the moving party is entitled to a judgment as a matter of law." Fed.R.Civ.P. 56(c); see also Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 247-48 (1986); Evans v. Techs. Apps. & Serv. Co., 80 F.3d 954, 958-59 (4th Cir. 1996). The party seeking summary judgment has the initial burden to show the absence of a genuine issue of material fact. Celotex Corp. v. Catrett, 411 U.S. 317, 325 (1986). A genuine issue of material fact exists "if the evidence is such that a reasonable jury could return a verdict for the nonmoving party." Anderson, 477 U.S. at 248. Once a motion for summary judgment is properly made and supported, the opposing party has the burden of showing that a genuine dispute exists. Matsushita Elec. Indus. Co. v. Zenith Radio Corp., 475 U.S. 574, 586-87 (1986). The facts shall be viewed, and all reasonable inferences drawn, in the light most favorable to the non-moving party. Id. at 255; see also Lettieri v. Equant Inc., 478 F.3d 640, 642 (4th Cir.2007). To defeat a properly supported motion for summary judgment, the non-moving party "must set forth specific facts showing that ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.