Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Otey v. Berryhill

United States District Court, W.D. Virginia, Abingdon Division

October 29, 2018

GAIL JANE OTEY, Plaintiff
v.
NANCY A. BERRYHILL, Acting Commissioner of Social Security, Defendant

          REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION

          Pamela Meade Sargent, United States Magistrate Judge

         I. Background and Standard of Review

         Plaintiff, Gail Jane Otey, (“Otey”), filed this action challenging the final decision of the Commissioner of Social Security, (“Commissioner”), denying her claim for disability insurance benefits, (“DIB”), under the Social Security Act, as amended, (“Act”), 42 U.S.C.A. § 423 et seq. (West 2011). Jurisdiction of this court is pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 405(g). Neither party has requested oral argument. This case is before the undersigned magistrate judge by referral pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 636(b)(1)(B). As directed by the order of referral, the undersigned now submits the following report and recommended disposition.

         The court's review in this case is limited to determining if the factual findings of the Commissioner are supported by substantial evidence and were reached through application of the correct legal standards. See Coffman v. Bowen, 829 F.2d 514, 517 (4th Cir. 1987). Substantial evidence has been defined as “evidence which a reasoning mind would accept as sufficient to support a particular conclusion. It consists of more than a mere scintilla of evidence but may be somewhat less than a preponderance.” Laws v. Celebrezze, 368 F.2d 640, 642 (4th Cir. 1966). “‘If there is evidence to justify a refusal to direct a verdict were the case before a jury, then there is “substantial evidence.”'” Hays v. Sullivan, 907 F.2d 1453, 1456 (4th Cir. 1990) (quoting Laws, 368 F.2d at 642).

         The record shows that Otey protectively filed her application for DIB on October 24, 2013, alleging disability as of December 31, 2011, based on manic depression, bipolar I disorder with mixed psychotic features, back pain and burning, anxiety and sciatic nerve problems in the leg. (Record, (“R.”), at 20, 187-88, 207.)[1] The claim was denied initially and upon reconsideration. (R. at 108-10, 113, 116-18, 120-22.) Otey then requested a hearing before an administrative law judge, (“ALJ”). (R. at 123.)

         By decision dated August 31, 2016, the ALJ denied Otey's claim. (R. at 20-32.) The ALJ found that Otey met the nondisability insured status requirements of the Act for DIB purposes through December 31, 2016. (R. at 22.) The ALJ found that Otey had not engaged in substantial gainful activity since December 31, 2011, the alleged onset date.[2] (R. at 22.) The ALJ found that the medical evidence established that Otey had severe impairments, namely degenerative disc disease, degenerative joint disease of the left shoulder, hiatal hernia and depression, but he found that Otey did not have an impairment or combination of impairments that met or medically equaled one of the listed impairments in 20 C.F.R. Part 404, Subpart P, Appendix 1. (R. at 22-24.) The ALJ found that Otey had the residual functional capacity to perform simple, routine light work that required no more than occasional climbing of ramps and stairs, kneeling, stooping, crouching and crawling, that did not require climbing ladders, ropes or scaffolds and that required no more than occasional interaction with the public, co-workers and supervisors.[3](R. at 24-30.) The ALJ found that Otey was unable to perform her past relevant work as a welder, a salvage yard laborer, an assistant manager and a receptionist. (R. at 30.) The ALJ further found that a significant number of jobs existed in the national economy that Otey could perform, including jobs as a packing line worker, a night cleaner and an assembler. (R. at 30-31.) Thus, the ALJ concluded that Otey was not under a disability as defined by the Act, and was not eligible for DIB benefits. (R. at 31-32.) See 20 C.F.R. § 404.1520(g) (2018).

         After the ALJ issued his decision, Otey pursued her administrative appeals, (R. at 186), but the Appeals Council denied her request for review. (R. at 1-5.) Otey then filed this action seeking review of the ALJ's unfavorable decision, which now stands as the Commissioner's final decision. See 20 C.F.R. § 404.981 (2018). This case is before this court on Otey's motion for summary judgment filed January 4, 2018, and the Commissioner's motion for summary judgment filed February 5, 2018.

         II. Facts

         Otey was born in 1962, (R. at 43, 187, 204), which classified her as a “person closely approaching advanced age” under 20 C.F.R. § 404.1563(d) at the time of the ALJ's decision. Otey has a high-school education and past work experience as a clerical worker and a metal sorter in a recycling plant, a grocery store meat department manager, a welder and a quality control worker at a semitrailer manufacturer. (R. at 46-50, 208, 226.) At her June 21, 2016, hearing, Otey testified that she stopped working in 2011 because she could not get out of bed 10 to 12 days monthly due to the “craziness in [her] head, ” including having auditory and visual hallucinations, which began after her son died. (R. at 50-53.) She stated that the “craziness” made her drink, but that she had not consumed alcohol since June 2014. (R. at 51-52.)

         Otey also testified that she experienced crying spells very often, which sometimes lasted a day or longer. (R. at 55.) She testified that she had experienced suicidal ideations, but had not attempted suicide. (R. at 55.) She stated that she often experienced panic attacks, stating that she could not go to the store because she would get scared and shaky when she was around others. (R. at 56-57.) Otey stated that quitting drinking had not improved these symptoms. (R. at 57.) Otey stated that she used to be athletic and work on her farm, but she had not been able to do these things in a long time. (R. at 57.) She testified that depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, (“PTSD”), were her worst problems. (R. at 57.)

         Otey also testified that she suffered from constant lower back pain. (R. at 57-58.) She stated that she had undergone lap band surgery and breast reduction surgery in an attempt to alleviate this back pain, but the surgeries did not help. (R. at 58.) She could not identify any triggers for the back pain, and she stated that nothing helped to alleviate it. (R. at 58-59.) Otey stated that she had received injections in her back, but they helped for only a couple of months. (R. at 60.) Otey further testified that she had sciatica, mostly in the right leg, but sometimes in the left leg, which radiated almost to her ankle. (R. at 59.) She testified that her doctor had not prescribed any medication for this. (R. at 59.) Otey testified that her back pain prevented her from doing anything around her house. (R. at 60.) She testified that she did not walk “too good” due to her pain and that climbing stairs “hurt [her].” (R. at 61.) However, she stated that she did not use a cane. (R. at 61.) She estimated that she could walk between 50 and 100 yards before having to sit down or change position and that she could stand for only a few minutes before having to sit down. (R. at 61-62.) Otey testified that she could not bend over at the waist, but that she could lift and carry five pounds and sit for about 20 minutes without difficulty. (R. at 62-63.) Otey testified that she had to lie down eight hours daily due to the pain and “the crazy.” (R. at 63.)

         Otey further testified that she had problems with her left shoulder and had been told by an orthopedic surgeon that something was torn which would heal on its own. (R. at 64-65.) She testified that she could not reach up with her left arm and had difficulty opening and closing doors. (R. at 65-66.) She stated that she could drive a car, but drove only approximately twice monthly to the grocery store. (R. at 66, 73.) She testified that because grocery lists confused her, she usually only picked up a few items at a time. (R. at 74.) Otey testified that she had undergone left knee surgery and still had difficulty both climbing and descending stairs. (R. at 66.) She further testified that she had undergone carpal tunnel surgery on her right wrist, which was not as strong as it used to be. (R. at 67-68.)

         Otey testified that she sometimes watched soap operas, but had difficulty keeping up with the storylines. (R. at 72.) She stated that, although she had alpacas, she only went to her farm once or twice monthly, and when she did go, her husband drove her while she stayed in the truck. (R. at 72-73.) Otey testified that her mother-in-law and husband took care of the household chores. (R. at 71-72.) She stated that she could not make herself a sandwich or use the microwave. (R. at 74-75.) Otey testified that she had no pets, and she engaged in no hobbies. (R. at 75.)

         Asheley Wells, a vocational expert, also was present and testified at Otey's hearing. (R. at 75-78.) Wells classified Otey's past work as a welder as medium[4]and skilled, as a salvage yard laborer as medium and unskilled, as an assistant manager as light and skilled and as a receptionist as sedentary[5] and semi-skilled. (R. at 76-77.) Wells was asked to consider a hypothetical individual of Otey's age, education and work history, who could perform simple, routine light work that did not require more than occasional crawling, crouching, kneeling, stooping and climbing of stairs and ramps, that did not require climbing of ladders, ropes or scaffolds and that did not require more than occasional interaction with the public. (R. at 77.) Wells testified that such an individual could not perform Otey's past work, but could perform other work existing in significant numbers in the national economy, including jobs as a packing line worker, a night cleaner and an assembler. (R. at 77-78.) Wells was next asked to consider the same individual, but who also could have no more than occasional interaction with co-workers and supervisors. (R. at 78.) Wells testified that this individual could perform the jobs previously listed. (R. at 78.) Next, Wells was asked to consider the same hypothetical individual, but who also would be off task approximately 20 percent of the workday. (R. at 78.) Wells testified that such an individual could not perform any work. (R. at 78.)

         In rendering his decision, the ALJ reviewed records from state agency psychologist Howard S. Leizer, Ph.D.; James Wickham, a state agency consultant; state agency psychologist Linda Dougherty, Ph.D.; state agency physician Dr. R.S. Kadian, M.D.; Dr. Laramie C. Triplett, M.D., with Magnolia Family Medicine; Wellmont Bristol Regional Medical Center; Dr. Maria Abeleda, M.D., a psychiatrist with Highlands Community Services; and Blue Ridge Orthopedics and Sports Medicine.

         Otey presented to the emergency department at Wellmont Bristol Regional Medical Center on October 24, 2011, with symptoms of severe depression, complicated by significant alcohol intake and an unknown quantity of medications. (R. at 348-61.) Otey reported that he had always been depressed and that her 19-year-old son had committed suicide five years previously. (R. at 349, 351, 356.) She also reported the recent death of a close friend. (R. at 349, 356.) Otey reported that she tended to binge drink every four to six weeks. (R. at 349.) Toxicology reports showed that Otey's blood alcohol level was 329 mg/dL. (R. at 388.) Dr. William Anthony Rafuls, M.D., diagnosed depression, not otherwise specified; chronic back pain; osteoarthritis; gastroesophageal reflux disease; unresolved grief over the death of her son; and chronic pain. (R. at 353.) Her then-current Global Assessment of Functioning, (“GAF”), [6] score was assessed 25.[7] (R. at 354.) She received individual and group therapy, and she demonstrated significant improvement in all depressive symptoms. (R. at 349.) Otey was discharged on October 26, 2011, with a normal mental status and good prognosis. (R. at 350.)

         Otey treated with Dr. Laramie C. Triplett, M.D., at Magnolia Family Medicine, from October 2011 through April 2012. (R. at 286-301.) On October 12, 2011, Otey complained of worsening depression, as well as low back pain and achy and crampy legs. (R. at 293-94.) Otey was in no acute distress, and she exhibited no tenderness of the spine, ribs or pelvis. (R. at 294.) She had mildly reduced extension and full flexion, mildly reduced lateral motion, bilaterally, and normal rotation in her spine, ribs and pelvis. (R. at 294.) Deep tendon reflexes were 2マ and symmetrical throughout, and straight leg raise testing was negative bilaterally. (R. at 294.) Otey was fully oriented, she appeared depressed, and recent and remote memory were intact. (R. at 294.) Dr. Triplett diagnosed depression, sacroiliac, (“SI”), pain and malaise and fatigue. (R. at 294.) He changed Otey's antidepressant medication, and he prescribed medication for Otey's back pain. (R. at 294.)

         On December 8, 2011, Otey reported minimal alcohol consumption. (R. at 289.) She denied fatigue, and she voiced no muscular complaints, but she reported that her knees hurt at times and that she experienced left sciatica. (R. at 289-90.) She stated that an SI joint injection had helped for approximately three months, but she did not want another one. (R. at 290.) Otey reported being hospitalized earlier that year for depression. (R. at 290.) She stated that her medications were adjusted at that time and that she felt “quite well.” (R. at 290.) Otey was in no acute distress, and deep tendon reflexes were 2マ and symmetrical throughout. (R. at 291.) She was fully oriented, she had an appropriate mood and affect, and recent and remote memory were intact. (R. at 291.) Dr. Triplett diagnosed dysthymic disorder and SI pain, among other things, and Otey was prescribed medications. (R. at 291.)

         On April 17, 2012, Otey returned to Dr. Triplett with continued complaints of being very anxious at times, as well as low back pain with sciatica in the left leg. (R. at 286-88.) She reported that the back and leg pain was so bad recently after she worked in her yard that she could not walk. (R. at 286.) She again stated her belief that the previous sacroiliac joint injection did not sufficiently relieve her pain to warrant another one. (R. at 286.) Otey was in no acute distress. (R. at 287.) Straight leg raise testing was positive on the left from the supine position. (R. at 287.) Deep tendon reflexes were 2マ and symmetrical throughout. (R. at 287.) Otey was fully oriented, her mood and affect were appropriate, and recent and remote memory were intact. (R. at 287-88.) Dr. Triplett diagnosed chronic, but stable, dysthymic disorder; and persistent sciatica. (R. at 288.) He prescribed clonazepam for anxiety, and he ordered x-rays of the lumbar spine. (R. at 288.)

         On June 6, 2012, Otey underwent lumbar facet injections at the L4-L5 level, bilaterally, without complication. (R. at 295-96.) However, she reported worsened pain after the injections. (R. at 296.)

         Otey presented to the emergency department at Wellmont Bristol Regional Medical Center on December 23, 2012, with complaints of depression and symptoms of alcohol dependence. (R. at 319-42.) At the time of admission, Otey had been drinking heavily for seven days. (R. at 320.) She reported a very long history of binge drinking, and she stated that she “could drink a box of wine per day.” (R. at 324.) She reported some brief visual hallucinations and poor concentration. (R. at 320, 322.) Otey stated that she stopped working two years previously to take care of her two children at home. (R. at 322.) She further reported that this time of year was the anniversary of her oldest son's death six years previously. (R. at 322.) On admission, Otey's mental status examination was significant for some anxious behaviors of rocking back and forth with some psychomotor retardation and depressed mood. (R. at 320.) She had a flat affect. (R. at 320.) Her blood alcohol level was 0.205. (R. at 320.) A musculoskeletal exam revealed a full range of motion in all extremities with no edema or tenderness. (R. at 328.) Otey was voluntarily admitted to Ridgeview Pavilion and placed on an alcohol detoxification protocol. (R. at 320.) In addition to her regular medications, Otey received Seroquel and, upon discharge, she received Campral for alcohol cravings. (R. at 321.) While at Ridgeview, Otey received group and individual therapy and displayed improved insight and coping skills. (R. at 320.) Otey had sufficiently stabilized by December 28, 2012, and was discharged home. (R. at 320.) Upon discharge, Otey was diagnosed with bipolar disorder type 2, most recent episode depressed, and alcohol abuse, among other conditions. (R. at 320.) A GAF score of 55[8] was assessed at discharge. (R. at 320.) Otey was scheduled for mental health therapy at Highlands Community Services. (R. at 321.)

         Otey saw Dr. Maria Abeleda, M.D., a psychiatrist, at Highlands Community Services, from February to July 2013. (R. at 400-01, 409-17.) Over this time, Otey's complaints included continued mood swings, difficulty sleeping, racing thoughts, visual and olfactory hallucinations, anxiety and worry, difficulty concentrating, low energy and crying spells. (R. at 400-01, 409, 412-13, 415-16.) In February, April and July 2013, she denied craving or consuming alcohol, but in June 2013, Otey stated that she occasionally drank wine. (R. at 400, 409, 412, 415.) Physical examinations consistently revealed that Otey had good eye contact, no tics or abnormal movements, a normal and steady gait and that she ambulated without assistance. (R. at 400-01, 409, 413, 415.) Mental status examinations consistently revealed that Otey was engaged, cooperative, attentive and amiable and that her thought processes were linear, logical and coherent. (R. at 401, 409, 413, 416.) She denied suicidal and homicidal ideations, and her fund of knowledge was adequate and insight was fair. (R. at 401, 409-10, 413, 416.) Some racing thoughts were noted, as was difficulty with attention span and concentration. (R. at 401, 409-10, 413, 416.) Otey's mood ranged from tearful, depressed, dysphoric and dysthymic in February and April 2013, to bright, stable and cheerful in June and July 2013. (R. at 401, 410, 413, 416.) Otey consistently reported that medications helped her symptoms. (R. at 400, 409, 415.) By July 19, 2013, Otey reported that she was doing much better. (R. at 400.) In June and July 2013, she reported taking care of her alpacas, which she enjoyed. (R. at 400, 415.) Her moods were stable, and she reported sleeping better. (R. at 400.) She was coping well with racing thoughts, and BuSpar had improved her anxiety symptoms. (R. at 400.) Over this time, Dr. Abeleda diagnosed Otey with unstable bipolar I disorder, mixed, with psychosis; and unstable PTSD, but by July 2013, she noted that the bipolar disorder and PTSD were no longer unstable, but improved. (R. at 401, 410, 413, 416.) Dr. Abeleda also diagnosed alcohol abuse and dependence in early remission. (R. at 401, 416.) She prescribed various medications, including BuSpar, Pristiq, Lamictal, Latuda and Campral. (R. at 410, 413, 417.)

         Otey was admitted to Wellmont Bristol Regional Medical Center on August 9, 2013, after presenting to the emergency department with an altered level of consciousness. (R. at 302-18.) Despite being described as lethargic and confused, she was oriented to person and place, cooperative and fully verbal, and her mental status was deemed to be within normal limits. (R. at 303-04.) She admitted drinking alcohol while driving home and did not remember anything after arriving home. (R. at 304.) A witness observed Otey drive her vehicle into a parked car in her driveway, and EMS was called when Otey did not get out of her vehicle for a long period. (R. at 304.) She denied suicidal or homicidal ideations. (R. at 304.) A neurological examination was within normal limits. (R. at 304.) A musculoskeletal examination revealed no extremity tenderness and a normal range of motion. (R. at 308-09.) Her mood and affect were normal. (R. at 309.) A CT scan of Otey's head was normal. (R. at 316-17.) She was diagnosed with acute alcohol intoxication and altered mental status. (R. at 309, 312.)

         Otey continued to receive treatment from Highlands Community Services from September to December 2013. (R. at 393-97, 401-07.) With the exception of the September 20, 2013, visit, Otey was doing well over this time period. On September 20, 2013, Otey reported that she was moody, depressed and anxious and worrying constantly about a real estate issue. (R. at 406-08.) She reported not sleeping well and an inability to concentrate. (R. at 406.) Otey stated that she did not feel like her medications were helping her. (R. at 406.) Nonetheless, she denied suicidal or homicidal thoughts, and she reported taking care of her animals. (R. at 406.) Otey denied alcohol abuse. (R. at 406.) On examination, Otey made good eye contact, and she was calm and relaxed with no tics or abnormal movements. (R. at 407.) Her gait was normal and steady, and she could ambulate without assistance. (R. at 407.) Otey was well engaged, cooperative, attentive, amiable and spontaneous with normal speech. (R. at 407.) She had a depressed, anxious and dysphoric mood and a dysthymic, full and congruent affect without labile thinking. (R. at 407.) Thought processes were linear, logical and coherent without looseness of associations or flight of ideas, but she had some racing thoughts. (R. at 407.) Otey had no hallucinations. (R. at 407.) She was alert and oriented with an adequate fund of knowledge, intact memory, fair insight and difficult attention span and concentration. (R. at 407.) Dr. Abeleda diagnosed unstable Bipolar I disorder, mixed, with psychosis; relapsed PTSD; and alcohol abuse and dependence in early remission. (R. at 407.)

         By October 7, 2013, Otey reported that she was doing very well and felt better on Risperdal. (R. at 403-05.) She reported more energy, but stated she continued to have mild mood swings and mild depression, but was better able to cope. (R. at 403.) Otey denied craving or drinking alcohol. (R. at 403.) She reported sleeping well, but this could be erratic. (R. at 403.) Otey denied suicidal or homicidal ideations, and she reported taking care of her animals. (R. at 403.) She reported that BuSpar had helped her anxiety. (R. at 403.) Otey's examination was largely unremarkable, including a normal and steady gait and an ability to ambulate without assistance. (R. at 404.) Her mood was bright, cheerful and stable, and her affect was euthymic, full and congruent without labile thinking. (R. at 404.) Thought processes were linear, logical and coherent without looseness of associations or flight of ideas, and she had no racing thoughts. (R. at 404.) Otey had no suicidal or homicidal ideations and no hallucinations. (R. at 404.) She was alert and oriented with an adequate fund of knowledge, intact memory, fair insight and adequate attention span and concentration. (R. at 404.) Dr. Abeleda diagnosed improved bipolar I disorder, mixed, with psychosis; improved PTSD; and alcohol abuse and dependence in early remission. (R. at 404.)

         On December 18, 2013, Otey saw Vicki Frasier, a qualified mental health professional, (“QMHP”), at Highlands Community Services for a Clinical Assessment. (R. at 393-99.) Otey reported that her son had passed away in December 2005 and that she had severe depression, emotionality and grief. (R. at 393-94.) She reported moderate fatigue or low energy, poor concentration, mood swings, anxiety, phobias, paranoid ideation, social isolation, guilt, appetite disturbance, agitation, conduct problems, hopelessness, worthlessness and dissociate state and mild delusions, hyperactivity, psychomotor retardation, poor grooming, irritability, panic attacks, limited social skills and elevated mood. (R. at 394.) Otey stated that she made lists to help her remember things, but she was unable to follow the lists on some days. (R. at 395.) She reported constant mood swings, but she stated that BuSpar helped to calm her agitation. (R. at 395.) She reported a history of auditory, visual and olfactory hallucinations, but she denied hallucinations while drinking alcohol. (R. at 395.) Otey denied suicidal or homicidal ideations. (R. at 395.) While she denied then-currently using alcohol, Otey stated that she drank “10 out of 30 days” and sometimes drank to intoxication. (R. at 395.) Based upon this assessment, Otey agreed to case management services, seeing a psychiatrist to manage and continue to prescribe psychotropic medications, undergoing substance abuse treatment and receiving therapy for grief and past abuse issues. (R. at 397.)

         When Otey returned to Dr. Abeleda two days later on December 20, 2013, she reported doing “very well, ” stating that she felt on “even keel” and was “coping well.” (R. at 418-20.) Her moods were stable, and she was sleeping well. (R. at 418.) Otey denied alcohol cravings or abuse. (R. at 418.) She reported some anxiety and tending to worry about things. (R. at 418.) Otey reported that, although BuSpar had helped, she had reduced her dosage because it made her drowsy. (R. at 418.) Otey reported staying busy with chores, including taking care of her animals, and that she had more energy. (R. at 418.) She denied suicidal or homicidal thoughts. (R. at 418.) On examination, Otey had good eye contact, and she was calm and relaxed with no tics or abnormal movements. (R. at 418.) Her gait was normal and steady, and she ambulated without assistance. (R. at 418.) Otey was open and well engaged, cooperative, attentive, amiable, spontaneous, calm and relaxed with normal speech. (R. at 419.) Her mood was bright, stable and cheerful with a euthymic, full and congruent affect with no lability of thinking. (R. at 419.) Thought processes were linear, logical and coherent without looseness of associations or flight of ideas, and she had no racing thoughts. (R. at 419.) She denied suicidal or homicidal ideations, as well as hallucinations. (R. at 419.) Otey was alert and oriented, she had an adequate fund of knowledge, intact memory, fair insight and adequate attention span and concentration. (R. at 419.) Dr. Abeleda diagnosed improved Bipolar I disorder, mixed, with psychosis; improved PTSD; and alcohol abuse and dependence in early remission. (R. at 419.)

         When Otey returned to Dr. Triplett on February 11, 2014, she reported that she had stopped drinking about six months previously. (R. at 446-50.) She described her health since her last visit as “fair.” (R. at 446.) Otey reported “[s]ciatica in both … legs, ” which was worse at night or when sitting for very long, and which radiated to the ankle in the right leg and to the knee in the left leg. (R. at 446.) Otey had undergone two epidural steroid injections, the first of which, she said, helped for a few months, but the second one did not help as much. (R. at 446.) On physical examination, Otey was alert and in no acute distress. (R. at 448.) Flexion of the lumbosacral spine was not restricted, but was painful, extension was restricted, left lateral flexion was not restricted, but was painful, and right lateral flexion was not restricted, but was painful. (R. at 448.) Rotation both to the left and right were not restricted and were painless. (R. at 448.) Straight leg raise testing was negative, and deep tendon reflexes were 2 and symmetric. (R. at 448.) Otey was oriented with a normal mood and affect, but she seemed distracted at times. (R. at 448.) Dr. Triplett diagnosed ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.